CrowdWater is a global Citizen Science project initiated by the University of Zurich, which collects hydrological data. The goal is to develop a cheap and easy data collection method that can be used to predict floods and low flow. The long-term aim of the project is to complement existing gauging station networks, especially in regions with a sparse measurement network, such as in developing countries.

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In a new video series, our partners from Schweiz Forscht portray some of their most dedicated Citizen Scientist on their website.

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Since the European Geosciences Union EGU holds its anual meeting in Vienna, Austria, we took the opportunity to catch up with Crowdwater, a  Science project about hydrology and water levels of rivers, soil moisture and stream spotting, running on the SPOTTERON Citizen Science platform.

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Shortnews

  • Summertime and the living is easy - especially for Citizen Scientists contributing their observations to projects running on the SPOTTERON platform.
    Excursions and field trips are excellent opportunities to observe nature in all its glory. From the phenological development of indicator plants for projects such as Climate Watch Australia or the ZAMG Nature's Calendar to mammal observations in Kenya via the MAKENYA App - there are plenty of different scientific fields in which citizens and scientists can engage in the collection of valuable scientific data via the SPOTTERON apps when they're out and about. Read more on the Citizen Science Blog.

    Monday, 13 September 2021
  • At SPOTTERON, we create Citizen Science Apps for a wide array of scientific fields. One of the most exciting topics in Citizen Science is phenology, the study of periodic events in biological life cycles and how seasonal variations influence these in climate.  SPOTTERON currently houses two major phenology projects on the platform, the ZAMG Naturkalender (Nature's Calendar) from Austria and Climate Watch Australia - the first phenology project of its kind in the southern hemisphere. Read more on the Citizen Science Blog.

    Monday, 09 August 2021