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New on the SPOTTERON Platform: ClimateWatch - a Citizen Science App for Climate Research

New on the SPOTTERON Platform: ClimateWatch - a Citizen Science App for Climate Research
The impacts of climate change are accelerating. Greenhouse gas concentrations drive global temperatures towards increasingly dangerous levels. A warming planet earth means rising sea levels, increased frequency and intensity of weather events, like fires, floods, cyclones, droughts, ocean acidification, and species loss. These are putting our health, livelihoods, food security, freshwater supply and economic growth at risk. It is time to take action on Climate Change and participate. 

The ClimateWatch program is the collaborative brainchild of Earthwatch Australia, the Bureau of Meteorology and the University of Melbourne to understand how changes in temperature and rainfall are affecting the seasonal behaviour of Australia's plants and animals. The first continental phenology project in the Southern Hemisphere, ClimateWatch enables every Australian to be involved in collecting and recording data that will help shape the country’s scientific response to climate change.


The ClimateWatch Citizen Science App - ReDesigned to make a difference

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ClimateWatch aims to understand the effects climate change is having on Earth's natural processes. Essentially, the project research is based on phenology, the study of periodic events in biological life cycles and how seasonal and year-to-year variations influence these in climate. Many studies already provided insight into the relationship between climate variables and the timing of these phenophases. By contributing their observations to the ClimateWatch App, Citizen Scientists are taking direct action to make a positive difference to the Climate crisis.

Our mission was to redesign the ClimateWatch App completely. The new Citizen Science App comes with a wide range of advanced features, integrated tools and enhanced functionality including interactive maps and social motivation for users with regular updates and high useability. Every app on SPOTTERON can use all existing features of the Citizen Science platform without any additional development costs. Future updates will see Species profiles and images to assist with identification and expanded Trails features. These new features are provided then again for free to every running project.

Climatewatch App spotteron presentation smartphone screens

ClimateWatch Australia selected around 180 indicator species that are affected by the Climate crisis and need to be monitored. An indicator species is an organism whose presence, absence, or abundance reflects a specific environmental condition. Together with the scientists behind ClimateWatch we created a detailed 'Add-Spot-Dialogue', which recognises all the important data, according to the different species of mammals, birds, insects, amphibians, plants, marines, reptiles and spiders. Therefore we designed custom detail buttons for every species to make the user-experience inviting and accessible throughout the whole questionnaire.



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The Website - A Platform to inform and create a vivid Citizen Science Community

What is an Active Citizen Science Community without a platform to share experience and interchange research results? To complete the redesign of the visual appearance of ClimateWatch Australia, we created a professional project website based on a Content Management System (CMS). Launched alongside the Citizen Science App, we offered a complete solution by providing a modern and appealing website for ClimateWatch, both on desktop and mobile devices.

The interface is optimised for easy administration and contains multiple extensions. It includes essential tools for creating new content like blog news, information pages, media presentations, and a newsletter system - to name a few. The website's design reflects the project's identity and adapts responsively to the various display sizes of modern devices, from HD full resolution to tablets and smartphone displays.

You can see the project website here: https://www.climatewatch.org.au

 


You can find the ClimateWatch App here:

Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.spotteron.climatewatch
iOS: https://apps.apple.com/us/app/climatewatch-spotteron/id1552422143
Web-App for the browser: https://www.spotteron.com/climatewatch

Live Citizen Science Map Application of ClimateWatch

 

Get more free Citizen Science Apps here

 

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Friday, 22 October 2021

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Shortnews

  • Summertime and the living is easy - especially for Citizen Scientists contributing their observations to projects running on the SPOTTERON platform.
    Excursions and field trips are excellent opportunities to observe nature in all its glory. From the phenological development of indicator plants for projects such as Climate Watch Australia or the ZAMG Nature's Calendar to mammal observations in Kenya via the MAKENYA App - there are plenty of different scientific fields in which citizens and scientists can engage in the collection of valuable scientific data via the SPOTTERON apps when they're out and about. Read more on the Citizen Science Blog.

    Monday, 13 September 2021
  • At SPOTTERON, we create Citizen Science Apps for a wide array of scientific fields. One of the most exciting topics in Citizen Science is phenology, the study of periodic events in biological life cycles and how seasonal variations influence these in climate.  SPOTTERON currently houses two major phenology projects on the platform, the ZAMG Naturkalender (Nature's Calendar) from Austria and Climate Watch Australia - the first phenology project of its kind in the southern hemisphere. Read more on the Citizen Science Blog.

    Monday, 09 August 2021